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VOLUME 7 , ISSUE 1 ( January-June, 2016 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Reduction Efficacy in Aerosol Production using 0.2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate Mouthwash in Dental Waterlines: A Clinicomicrobiological Study

Suresh K Kasagani, Aditya G Rao, Kafeel Ahmed, Ghousia Fatima, Roopali Tapashetti

Citation Information : Kasagani SK, Rao AG, Ahmed K, Fatima G, Tapashetti R. Reduction Efficacy in Aerosol Production using 0.2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate Mouthwash in Dental Waterlines: A Clinicomicrobiological Study. J Health Sci Res 2016; 7 (1):1-5.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10042-1024

Published Online: 01-06-2016

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2016; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Introduction

Aerosol is a suspension of solid or liquid particles containing bacteria or viruses, suspended for at least a few seconds in a gas. The aerosol generated by an ultrasonic scaler contains microorganisms that can penetrate into the body through the respiratory system of dental surgeons and patients. The oral cavity harbors numerous bacteria and viruses from the respiratory tract, dental plaque, and oral fluids. Any dental procedure that has a potential to aerosolize saliva will cause airborne contamination with organisms.

Aim

To evaluate and compare the reduction efficacy in the levels of aerosol production at 1 foot, 5 feet, and 10 feet distance using 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash in dental waterlines.

Materials and methods

This single-center, randomized, two-group parallel design study was conducted over a period of 20 days. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis were randomly divided into two groups: Test group and control group. Both the group samples were subjected to ultrasonic scaling. In the test group, 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash was added in the water dispenser bottle, whereas in the control group, distilled water was used. Blood agar plates were kept at distances of 1 foot, 5 feet, and 10 feet away from the headrest of the dental chair. Blood agar plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 hours, and the total number of colony-forming units (CFUs) was counted and statistically analyzed.

Results

The results of this study revealed that the experimental group showed higher reduction efficacy for aerosol production at 1 foot, 5 feet, and 10 feet distance from the center of the headrest of the dental chair compared with the control group. The results of this study also revealed that the number of CFUs was statistically significant only at 1 foot distance (p = 0.009) from the center of the headrest of the dental chair and not at 5 feet (p = 0.122) and 10 feet (p = 0.507) distances for both the groups.

Conclusion

This present study shows that the patient's chest area at a distance of 1 foot from the center of the headrest of dental chair receives a greater number of microorganisms than that at distances of 5 feet and 10 feet from the headrest of the dental chair. This validates the use of chlorhexidine in the form of an irrigant in dental waterlines as an additional barrier to cross-contamination, minimizing the risk to team members and the patient.

How to cite this article

Kasagani SK, Rao AG, Ahmed K, Fatima G, Tapashetti R. Reduction Efficacy in Aerosol Production using 0.2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate Mouthwash in Dental Waterlines: A Clinicomicrobiological Study. J Health Sci Res 2016;7(1):1-5.


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